Timeline with Shortcode

March 22, 2018 by hrf In The Media, Uncategorized 0

As Seen on ESPN!

Morningside 5 is an ESPN, 30 for 30, directed by Mike Tollin, featuring one of our beloved counselors Dwight Curry. The film is a unique story that chronicles the lives of five men through a 25-year window. It not only depicts the passion they had for the game of basketball, but also documents how they coped with being local celebrities at the tender age of 18 and what came of their lives once the ball stopped rolling. The story is about over- coming adversity and is a message Dwight is able to carry to our students. Morningside 5 also features our foundation and our founder, Jeff Robinson.

Read On
February 11, 2018 by admin Board Of Directors 0

David Moss

David was the CEO of a successful financial planning business in Northern California where he also spent 9 years as a firefighter EMT. While living in Humboldt County, Mr. Moss managed one of the largest reggae music festivals in the Western United States, Reggae on the River and was a Co-Founder of Reggae Rising Music Festival started in 2007. Mr. Moss has also worked in the non-profit world with kids charities for 20 years before he became involved with the Harold Robinson Foundation. Mr. Moss is currently acting General Manager for both DBO Investments and its wholly-owned brand, 1130 Artisans.

Read On
November 22, 2017 by admin Pedal On The Pier 0

Pedal On The Pier

Join Us on Sunday, June 3, 2018 at the beautiful Santa Monica Pier for our annual Pedal On The Pier event.

Read On
September 21, 2016 by hrf sponsor 0

Sponsorv1

Often searching out the graphical symmetry in chaos, while still maintaining the personality and emotion of the subject. The excitement and anticipation as we waited to see the next piece of unpredictable chaos was electric.

Read On
April 27, 2014 by admin Uncategorized 0

Denise learned all about the “Pedal on the Pier”

Denise learned all about the “Pedal on the Pier” event in Santa Monica

this segment aired on 95.5 KLOS on April 27, 2014

Read On
April 26, 2014 by admin In The Media 0

Inner City Youth is Getting Off The Streets and Into The Outdoors With The Harold Robinson Foundation

Joyce Hyser Robinson, co-founder of the Harold Robinson Foundation, joined us with details on the’The Markham Project’. The project includes hosting a weekend retreat with 100 students from Markham Middle School. Through this project Joyce shares the importance of getting inner city youth out of their negative surroundings, exposing them to nature and to help promote confidence, trust and team building.
If you are interested in getting involved with the Harold Robinson Foundation you can pre-register for their “Pedal On The Pier” event taking place on June 1st, at the Santa Monica Pier.

Harold Robinson Foundation

Pedal On The Pier

This segment aired on the KTLA Morning News on Saturday April 26, 2014

Read On
April 10, 2014 by admin In The Media 0

Can the Children of Watts Change Their Troubled Hood?

Prophet Walker, a Watts native, was abandoned at the Nickerson Gardens housing project down the street from Markham Middle School at the age of six by his heroin addicted mother. He got into a fight at sixteen during which a CD player was broken and was tried as an adult for assault and robbery, spending six years in prison.

Though wronged as a boy, he had an inner drive, and started a college program for inmates who wanted to get two-year degrees. After Walker graduated from Loyola Marymount last May, he got involved in work that some experts think could stop Watts children from drifting into crime or violence: simply put, by getting the kids out of town.

A super-secure Watts ice cream truck.

A super-secure Watts ice cream truck.

Walker, who is now is running for California’s 64th state Assembly District, started working with Markham Middle School’s longtime mentor to students David Moss, who takes hundreds of children from Watts for camp retreats four times a year in the Angeles National Forest.

There, for a few weeks during the off-season, the popular Canyon Creek Sports Camp becomes “Camp Ubuntu,” taken from a South African philosophy that cherishes the community as well as the individual and can be summarized with the phrase, “I am because we are.”

Moss explains to L.A. Weekly that troubled Markham Middle School and its students play an unusual role in altering the future of Watts itself – because Markham is where many children representing the area’s “four rival housing projects meet for the first time.”

The 81-acre camp in the Angeles National Forest welcomes low-income students and families accustomed to the tough streets of Watts – but not accustomed to woods, creeks and complete safety to play outdoors after twilight.

Their stay is funded by donations and the annual charity event Pedals on the Pier, where $636,413 was raised last year.

David Moss introduces Randy Willhite, Dhakir Warren, Prophet Walker and Joe Evans to Markham sixth-graders.

David Moss introduces Randy Willhite, Dhakir Warren, Prophet Walker and Joe Evans to Markham sixth-graders.
Calvin Alagot

The driving force behind it, Moss, is president and co-founder of the Harold Robinson Foundation, a Los Angeles nonprofit that oversees the weekend camp retreats aimed at letting children and their families build better bonds and strengthen community ties outside the street rules of Watts.

For decades, the children from Jordan Downs, Nickerson Gardens, Imperial Courts and Gonzaque Village, particularly the boys, have been at odds – sometimes even at war.

Markham Middle School is a strange place to launch a community cohesion revolution. It’s not even a place most parents would send their kids, if they could choose.

Current statewide test scores show that Markham’s teachers and students are stuck in academic failure. Most telling is Markham’s 2012 Similar Schools rating – which parents can view online to see how their school is faring against other California schools with identical levels of poverty and the same racial mix.

In the Similar Schools ranking, Markham is among the worst of the worst middle schools in California: It earns at dismal 2 out of 10 against matching schools. It is known as a dropout factory where smart, eager grade-schoolers go to fail. The school has attracted the attention of LAUSD Superintendent John Deasy.

Yet Markham’s kids show their great, untapped promise. Four eighth-graders at Markham were named middle school champions of the 2013 MESA National Engineering Design Competition in Oregon, after being mentored by Julio Romero, Danae Tousant, Ashley Baker and Jacqueline Sanchez from the MESA outreach program at The Henry Samueli School of Engineering.

A Watts neighborhood near the towers.

A Watts neighborhood near the towers.

Moss says his own foundation is focusing on Markham’s sixth-graders because the transition into this middle school – from quiet and non-violent grade schools such as Weigand Elementary – is tough. And even before they arrive, he says, they have been exposed to street violence in divided Watts.

So, “We’re not changing them right the second they come to camp,” says Moss, “but we’re exposing them to each other, to new things, to new attitudes and we’re planting seeds for the future.”

Walker, who works closely with Moss, is at the same time a leading member of the Anti-Recidivism Coalition (A.R.C.), founded by The Hangover producer Scott Budnick. Walker and Budnick, via A.R.C., advocate prison reform and sentencing reform. And the group puts its money where its mouth is by providing incarcerated youth a second chance   – by helping them join the work force.

Together at Camp Ubuntu, Moss and Walker hired A.R.C members as counselors and mentors.

Walker says “Innately we’re all great, we all have the power to affect change in our lives and the lives of others.”

Budnick says that the coalition has grown to more than 140 formerly incarcerated members and that the children definitely relate to them:

“It’s making a huge difference because the A.R.C. members were these kids, they were dealing with the exact same issues, they were dealing with the exact same struggles, they came from the exact same neighborhoods. The bonds that our members make with our kids over these weekends are unbelievable.”

 

The Harold Robinson Foundation wants to bring the same community-building exercises used at camp to the Markham campus, though a summer day camp where children can gather and play.

Dhakir Warren, director of the Markham summer day camp, says that the students will take weekly field trips to the beach or universities. Warren says the foundation understands that community-building like this will take time, and says of the growing number of adult volunteers, “This is a labor of love.”

Read On
September 13, 2013 by admin In The Media 0

Camp for inner city kids aims to stop Los Angeles gang violence

September 13, 2013 12:00:00 AM PDT

What does swimming, rope climbing and camping have to do with fighting gang violence? Everything, according to the owner of a kids camp in Lake Hughes.More than 100 inner city kids are at Canyon Creek Camp in an effort to stop the cycle of gang violence in South Los Angeles. Jeff and Joyce Robinson own the camp.

“They are not having a childhood and they come up here and they have a chance at a childhood,” said Joyce Robinson.

For many of the 118 kids who stepped off a bus Friday morning at the camp, it was their first time away from the housing projects, the gangs and the violence that are too often a part of their daily lives.

“We are working toward something that is really historical,” said Joyce Robinson.

The Robinsons believe nature and love can touch children’s lives to help break the cycle of gang violence and crime in the inner city, one child at a time.

“They have never seen mountains. They’ve never seen deer. They can’t even dream about these things because they don’t even know they exist,” said Jeff Robinson.

“It’s fun and wonderful. You get to go hiking and swimming and all that,” said Toria Weaver, a camp participant.

For four years now, Canyon Creek Camp has hosted more than 3,000 inner city kids throughout Los Angeles. The Harold Robinson Foundation, named in honor of Jeff Robinson’s late father, picks up the more than $250,000 price tag per year to show these kids they are not enemies from rival gang territory, but rather just kids who deserve a better life.

“I grew up like them so I know how hard it is,” said camp counselor Darlene Frontuto. “We were stuck in apartments or having to watch what street we crossed just in case that was an enemy’s territory.”

Camp counselor James Anderson says the camp has a positive effect on the kids.

“Every single time we have a retreat up here, it always ends with these kids having open hearts and their parents crying because they see something they don’t see in their neighborhoods, and that’s love,” said Anderson.

To donate to the Harold Robinson Foundation, visit www.haroldrobinsonfoundation.org.

Read On
June 3, 2013 by admin In The Media 0

Spinning Sisters

New mom Hilary Duff and her sister Haylie Duff participated in the “Pedal on the Pier” charity event in Santa Monica, Calif on June 3.

Read On
May 29, 2013 by admin In The Media 0

Pedal 100 Miles and Never Leave the Pier

 

One true statement about piers and things with wheels? They go way back.

Back to the invention of the boardwalk but probably even before then. Why? Because people like spinning through a beach-adjacent breeze. Science doesn’t even need to test that theory. Let’s call it simple fact.

But what of a mode of transport that is a) on a pier but b) doesn’t actually move? Either that’s a Ferris wheel or roller coaster or you’re at Pedal on the Pier, the annual multi-bike, multi-rider, multi-mile fundraiser for the Harold Robinson Foundation.

Pedal on the Pier will roll for 100 miles — roll in place, rather — on Sunday, June 2.Some 400  riders’ll take over the pedaling duties, while hundreds of non-riding attendees will gather to provide entertainment, music, and take over the general cheering-on duties.

How long will this take? Around five hours. How much money is Pedal on the Pier attempting to raise? Five hundred thousand dollars.

That half million dollars will go toward providing “underprivileged children free, year-round camp retreats where they experience nature and participate in diverse recreational programs designed to strengthen confidence and independence, build character and develop leadership skills.”

Want to register as a rider and raise funds? You can. Want to go and cheer people on? You can. Want to donate from right where you are? You can do that, too.

It’s rare to see a moving conveyance on the pier that isn’t technically moving, but, yep, if we were to say the whole day is moving, what with people coming together to raise money for something important, well. It would be hard to disagree with that sentiment.

Read On

Key Events

  • June 1, 2008

    HAROLD ROBINSON FOUNDATION FOUNDED

    The foundation was established in honor of Harold Robinson.
  • August 16, 2009

    FOUNDATION ESTABLISHED

    HRF becomes an official 501(c)3
  • September 11, 2010

    100 MILES FOR A CHILD

    First Funraising Event: "100 Miles for a Child" A Bike Ride from Watts to Oxnard and ending in Malibu raised $100,000.
  • June 16, 2011

    PEDAL ON THE PIER

    We launch Pedal on the Pier a unique fundraising event the first of it’s kind in Southern CA. We raised $254,000
  • August 16, 2012

    HRF INVOLVES PARENTS

    HRF launches their Parenting Workshops, Parent From The Heart. Pedal on the Pier raises $512,228.
  • August 16, 2017

    WATTS UNITED

    HRF hosts the first ever Watts United retreat, bringing together the 4 warring housing developments in Watts. Pedal on the Pier raises $636,413
  • August 16, 2017

    MARKHAM PROJECT

    Camp Ubuntu Watts formally known as the Markham Project, a 6 week summer day camp in the heart of Watts is launched. Pedal on the PIER raises $595,029.
  • August 16, 2017

    CAMP UBUNTU

    The Harold Robinson Foundation adopts the philosophy of Ubuntu, and renames their camp retreats, Camp Ubuntu. Pedal on the Pier raises $861,809.
  • August 16, 2017

    SCHOOLS & COMMUNITY

    Ubuntu is embraced by our schools and community. Harold Robinson Foundation/Camp Ubuntu has begun to evolve into more of a movement for change than a simple non-profit. Pedal on the Pier raises $868,967.
  • February 19, 2018

    PACE JOINS THE MOVEMENT

    Pedal on the Pier raised $1,063,217 and HRF was adopted by the Philanthropy and Engagement Community Engagement organization (P.A.C.E.).
  • June 1, 2008

    HAROLD ROBINSON FOUNDATION FOUNDED

    The foundation was established in honor of Harold Robinson.
  • August 16, 2009

    FOUNDATION ESTABLISHED

    HRF becomes an official 501(c)3
  • September 11, 2010

    100 MILES FOR A CHILD

    First Funraising Event: "100 Miles for a Child" A Bike Ride from Watts to Oxnard and ending in Malibu raised $100,000.
  • June 16, 2011

    PEDAL ON THE PIER

    We launch Pedal on the Pier a unique fundraising event the first of it’s kind in Southern CA. We raised $254,000
  • August 16, 2012

    HRF INVOLVES PARENTS

    HRF launches their Parenting Workshops, Parent From The Heart. Pedal on the Pier raises $512,228.
  • August 16, 2017

    WATTS UNITED

    HRF hosts the first ever Watts United retreat, bringing together the 4 warring housing developments in Watts. Pedal on the Pier raises $636,413
  • August 16, 2017

    MARKHAM PROJECT

    Camp Ubuntu Watts formally known as the Markham Project, a 6 week summer day camp in the heart of Watts is launched. Pedal on the PIER raises $595,029.
  • August 16, 2017

    CAMP UBUNTU

    The Harold Robinson Foundation adopts the philosophy of Ubuntu, and renames their camp retreats, Camp Ubuntu. Pedal on the Pier raises $861,809.
  • August 16, 2017

    SCHOOLS & COMMUNITY

    Ubuntu is embraced by our schools and community. Harold Robinson Foundation/Camp Ubuntu has begun to evolve into more of a movement for change than a simple non-profit. Pedal on the Pier raises $868,967.
  • February 19, 2018

    PACE JOINS THE MOVEMENT

    Pedal on the Pier raised $1,063,217 and HRF was adopted by the Philanthropy and Engagement Community Engagement organization (P.A.C.E.).